Archive for April 15th, 2012

Condyloma aka Genital warts

Sunday, April 15th, 2012
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Genital warts is a very contagious disease that is sexually transmitted. The disease is caused by various variants of the Human papillomavirus. Usuall these are the HPV 6 and the HPV 11. it is spread during oral, genital, or anal sex with someone who is infected with the virus. Approximately two-thirds of people who have anyone single sexual contact with someone who is infected with genital warts will develop warts. The disease normally develops within three months of contact. Women will develop the warts on the outside and inside of the vagina, on the entrance to the uterus, and sometimes around the anus. Although Genital warts are equally prevalent in men as in women, the symptoms of the disease are generally much less obvious. When a male is infected with the disease the wards are normally seen on the tip of the penis. They also may be found on the shaft of the penis, on the scrotum, and around the anus. It is very rare forgenital wartsto develop in the mouth or throat of a person who has been involved in oral sex with an infected partner. With that said though it is still out there! Genital warts will usually exist in clusters and can be very tiny. They can also spread into large masses in the genital or anal area. A doctor or any health care worker can usually diagnose the disease by seeing their existance on a patient. This information is accurate to all knowledge but if you are looking for official help with Genital Warts it is recommended that you seek help from a Professional Doctor.

Improving Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms

Sunday, April 15th, 2012

Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease where white blood cells suddenly attack healthy tissues, specifically joints and cartilage. There are a few ways to help ease the symptoms, depending on which stage of the disease you are in. If you are in the early stages of rheumatoid arthritis there is a new disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) which has done an excellent job in controlling symptoms. It works best in the initial stages, so if you suspect you may have rheumatoid arthritis, see your doctor as soon as possible. There are other options if you are in later stages of rheumatoid arthritis. These are also helpful if you are still in early stages. One is to use anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen. This does a great job reducing pain and inflammation. However, these have side effects including heart problems and gastrointestinal bleeding. You can also use acetaminophen for your rheumatoid arthritis, which does not have these side effects. When symptoms are mild, moderate exercising including stretching, weight lifting, and aerobics ease rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. Be sure to rest when your joints flare up as this would just add strain to your aching joints. Stretching is important because it increases flexibility and is easy enough to do at any age. When stretching, stop when you feel mild discomfort and hold for 10 to 30 seconds. Then repeat 3 to 5 times. Weight lifting also improves flexibility as well as strength and balance. Barbells are easy, convenient, and inexpensive. Remember to stretch before lifting any weights. Start with 3 sets of 8 to 10 repetitions. If you would like you can start with no weights at all (such as going leg lifts for rheumatoid arthritis in the knees), then add weights when you can. Lift the weights slowly and evenly to not damage the cartilage. Some other popular forms of exercise for rheumatoid arthritis are aqua therapy and Tai Chi. Be sure to find an actual therapist as they have specific exercises they do for arthritis patients. Aerobics instructors may push to far and do further damage. Tai Chi has no long term studies proving its effectiveness, but due to testimonials from patients who have taken Tai Chi, the Arthritis Foundation began offering the class. Remember to always check with your doctor before starting an exercise program. Some other ways to relieve rheumatoid arthritis pain are to lose weight to take additional pressure off joints, eating a healthy diet, getting enough sleep, using heat or ice, and possibly using devices such as a cane, brace, or splint. There are many resources for additional information on rheumatoid arthritis including websites, flyers, periodicals, books, etc. Your doctor should be able to provide you with some reference on where to look for additional help. DISCLAIMER: This information is not presented by a medical practitioner and is for educational and informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read. Since natural and/or dietary supplements are not FDA approved they must be accompanied by a two-part disclaimer on the product label: that the statement has not been evaluated by FDA and that the product is not intended to “diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.”

Symptoms Of Crohn’s Disease – How To Tell If Someone May Have It

Sunday, April 15th, 2012

Crohn’s Disease is sometimes difficult to identify, as the symptoms mimic many other gastrointestinal disorders. However, once you recognize an inflammatory bowel disease, specific testing can be completed to determine if Crohn’s is an issue. The primary symptom associated with Crohn’s Disease is diarrhea. The inflammation of the intestines experienced as a result of the disorder causes excessive amounts of salt and water to be produced that the body can not reabsorb. The body, in turn, attempts to dispose of the excess fluid causing diarrhea. Intestinal contractions also contribute to this process. The severity of diarrhea will vary by individual, from mildly loose occurring slightly more frequently to extremely watery occurring multiple times a day. Another sign of Crohn’s is bleeding of the intestines, typically seen in the stool of the sufferer. This is caused by the swelling and inflammation of the intestinal wall, which becomes damaged as waste passes through the body. Depending on the severity, this can be of major concern, causing anemia and other complications. Ranging in color from bright red to darker shades, blood in one’s stool should cause concern. Abdominal pain and cramping are also common with Crohn’s Disease, as inflammation worsens. The swelling itself can be painful; however, the passage of waste through inflamed channels causes more discomfort. The longer inflammation lasts, the walls of the intestinal tract become thick with scar tissue, which worsens that matter. Crohn’s sufferers also sometimes endure ulcers and sores as a result of the disease. Also caused as a result of inflammation, the intestines can develop abrasions that enlarge into ulcers. This correlates with abdominal pain and cramping as well. However, it can also lead to infection and other complications. People that suffer from this disease are sometimes affected in unlikely areas of their life as well. When someone experiences digestive problems, they often lose their appetite and desire to consume food. This coupled with absorption problems, due to inflammation, may lead to malnutrition and weight loss. Severe cases of Crohn’s Disease also exhibit fever, fatigue, and other issues that do not relate to the intestines, such as arthritis or liver disorders. However, the intensity of symptoms experienced will vary greatly from person to person. While some will have severe side effects, others may have very few. Because this disease is a chronic disorder, symptoms may also disappear for extended periods of time, only to return unexpectedly.